Student Safety Message!

under-construction-flashing-barracade-animationThere is a lot of work on the roads around the school and neighbourhood. Please speak with your child(ren) to be aware of their surroundings when walking to and from school or playing in the area.  While the big equipment and construction can be an attraction to kids, it is important that they are aware of the danger and are cautious. As well, please note that on July 2, Henderson Avenue will be closed for similar road work through the summer months.

YRDSB Survey to improve school websites: Your input will be helpful.

Help us improve our websites

We are refreshing the www.yrdsb.ca website and our school websites, and invite you to share your feedback through a brief survey. The information from the surveys will help us ensure that the content, navigation and layout meet the needs of students, families and community members.

Our websites provide important information about our school and Board, resources to help your child succeed, school programs and more.

The two-part survey is anonymous, confidential and voluntary, and should take about 10-15 minutes to complete. If you have any questions please contact communications@yrdsb.ca.

The survey will be available until June 12 at bit.ly/YRDSBwebsurvey.

tvo mPower at home…Math Fun/Learning

Dear parents,
Did you know that there is a new online resource that supports the development of foundational K-6  math and STEM skills?

TVO mPower, developed by the creators of award-winning TVOkids, offers a series of exciting, cross-curricular and FREE online math games that foster positive attitudes towards math in the classroom and at home.

The games reflect the Ontario curriculum, are learner-centric and advertising­ free.

If your child needs to strengthen his/her math skills, or is simply ready to take them to a new level, join the 100,000+ Ontario elementary school students who have already been registered to use mPower.

To get started, go to mpower to create a TVO mPower account for your child. It’s safe, easy and will help support the mastery of tough-to-learn math concepts and inspire a love of math.

Warm regards,
Michael Sheasgreen President

Common Sense Media for Parents

 Strategies for Getting Kids off Devices

Ever try to pry a tablet from sticky fingers? Check out these tips to avoid the tantrum. By Christine Elgersma 
Topics: Screen Time
5 Strategies for Getting Kids off Devices

“Just a sec,” say nine out of 10 parents answering an email when their kid asks them for something. If it’s hard for us to jump out of the digital world, just imagine you’re 3 and the lines between fantasy and reality are already blurred — then throw in a super-engaging, colorful, fun, immersive experience. Or you’re 5 and each episode of Mutt &  Stuff on the Nick Jr. app is better than the last. Or you’re 8 and you’re almost finished building something amazing in Minecraft. Why would you ever want to stop?

This is why getting kids off their devices is so tough. And when threatening doesn’t work, and you discover the research that two-minute warnings aren’t the best option either, what can you do? Thankfully, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some new guidelinesaround screen use that ease some parental guilt, but you still need to get your kid off the iPad at some point. Aside from being a strong role model, try these tips to minimize conflict and find the balance we’re all seeking.

  • Have another activity lined up (bonus points for making it seem fun). For the youngest device users, transitions are hard — period.  Even if the next “to do” is a “must do” (such as eating lunch), tell your kid what’s coming next. You can rehearse the process: “When I say stop, it’s time for the iPad to go night-night. Let’s see how fast you can flip it shut! As soon as it’s asleep, we can sneak into the other room and paint.”
  • Use visual and sound cues to help kids keep track of time limits. For kids who don’t yet know how to tell time, try a timer that can help put them in charge of the process: “When the time is up, it’ll look and sound like this.”
  • Find apps with built-in timers. Video streamers like Cakey and Huvi throw parents a bone and have internal timers so the app stops on its own. Then it’s up to the parent to make sure kiddo doesn’t just jump into another app.
  • Tell kids to stop at a natural break, such as the end of an episode, level, or activity. It’s hard for kids (and adults!) to stop in the middle of something. Before your kid gets on a device, talk about what they want to do or play, what will be a good place to stop, and how long they think it’ll take. Set the limit together and hold to it, though a little wiggle room (a couple of minutes so they can finish) is fine.
  • Discuss consequences and follow through when kids test the limits. When all else fails, it’s important to have discussed consequences for when your kid won’t give it up. For little kids, the line can be something like, “If it’s too hard to turn off, the tablet has to go away for a whole day.” For older kids it’s more about keeping devices in a public space, setting expectations, and enforcing them. If they show you they can be partners in moderating and regulating themselves, there can be more flexibility.

     Strategies for Getting Kids off Devices

    Ever try to pry a tablet from sticky fingers? Check out these tips to avoid the tantrum. By Christine Elgersma 
    Topics: Screen Time
    5 Strategies for Getting Kids off Devices

    “Just a sec,” say nine out of 10 parents answering an email when their kid asks them for something. If it’s hard for us to jump out of the digital world, just imagine you’re 3 and the lines between fantasy and reality are already blurred — then throw in a super-engaging, colorful, fun, immersive experience. Or you’re 5 and each episode of Mutt &  Stuff on the Nick Jr. app is better than the last. Or you’re 8 and you’re almost finished building something amazing in Minecraft. Why would you ever want to stop?

    This is why getting kids off their devices is so tough. And when threatening doesn’t work, and you discover the research that two-minute warnings aren’t the best option either, what can you do? Thankfully, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some new guidelinesaround screen use that ease some parental guilt, but you still need to get your kid off the iPad at some point. Aside from being a strong role model, try these tips to minimize conflict and find the balance we’re all seeking.

    • Have another activity lined up (bonus points for making it seem fun). For the youngest device users, transitions are hard — period.  Even if the next “to do” is a “must do” (such as eating lunch), tell your kid what’s coming next. You can rehearse the process: “When I say stop, it’s time for the iPad to go night-night. Let’s see how fast you can flip it shut! As soon as it’s asleep, we can sneak into the other room and paint.”
    • Use visual and sound cues to help kids keep track of time limits. For kids who don’t yet know how to tell time, try a timer that can help put them in charge of the process: “When the time is up, it’ll look and sound like this.”
    • Find apps with built-in timers. Video streamers like Cakey and Huvi throw parents a bone and have internal timers so the app stops on its own. Then it’s up to the parent to make sure kiddo doesn’t just jump into another app.
    • Tell kids to stop at a natural break, such as the end of an episode, level, or activity. It’s hard for kids (and adults!) to stop in the middle of something. Before your kid gets on a device, talk about what they want to do or play, what will be a good place to stop, and how long they think it’ll take. Set the limit together and hold to it, though a little wiggle room (a couple of minutes so they can finish) is fine.
    • Discuss consequences and follow through when kids test the limits. When all else fails, it’s important to have discussed consequences for when your kid won’t give it up. For little kids, the line can be something like, “If it’s too hard to turn off, the tablet has to go away for a whole day.” For older kids it’s more about keeping devices in a public space, setting expectations, and enforcing them. If they show you they can be partners in moderating and regulating themselves, there can be more flexibility. Parenting, Media, and Everything In Between