International and Indigenous Languages Program Registration for 2019-2020

International and Indigenous Languages (IIL) Program Registration for 2019-2020

Elementary International and Indigenous Languages Program Registration for the 2019-2020 school year will begin on Thursday, April 11, 2019. We are pleased to announce that we are now offering online registration for our elementary program. Registering online will eliminate wait times and long line-ups.  To facilitate registration, on Thursday, April 11, 2019 at 4:00 pm, online registration will be available for the first time through Edsby on our webpage: www.yrdsb.ca/international-languages

Families can still register in person at the language site starting April 11 and in September. Please contact our office at international.languages@yrdsb.ca  if you would like to register in person before September.

Did you know that the IIL Program has over 20 languages to choose from? Currently we have approximately 15,000 students registered in our programs across the Board.  Students from SK to Grade 8 are eligible to take language classes that run once a week during weekday evenings (from Tuesday to Friday) or Saturday mornings for 2.5 hours. There are many new and exciting things in store for the upcoming 2019/2020 school year, such as the opportunity to learn the Indigenous languages Ojibwe and Cree.

Please note that due to space limitations, registration applications will take place on a first-come-first-serve basis. Classes may be cancelled due to low enrolment or lack of teacher availability.

For more information about registration, courses, dates and locations, please visit www.yrdsb.ca/international-languages or e-mail us at international.languages@yrdsb.ca.

Be Safe Online – important info for parents.

Online Safety

Dear Families,

As you may be aware, there has been recent media attention on an Internet challenge that may cause concern for families. The Internet provides access to many engaging learning opportunities, but requires responsible use and digital citizenship. Parents play an important role in ensuring their child’s safety, including on the Internet. It’s important for parents to talk to children about the importance of being safe, protecting their personal information and stressing that they should never disclose personal details that would allow someone online to contact them in real life.

Here are 12 tips to promote safe online behaviour:

  • Children should never give anyone their name, address, telephone number, computer password, or any other personal information on the Internet without parental or guardian consent.
  • Children should only use social media and websites approved by their parent or guardian.
  • Internet use should be encouraged in a central place in your home where you can supervise children’s online activities.
  • Don’t allow a webcam in a child’s bedroom.
  • Watch for children quickly minimizing sites when you enter the room.
  • Reinforce that people online may not be who they say they are.
  • Consider using parental controls like Internet filters or blocking software.
  • Remind children that everything said online stays in cyberspace forever, whether or not it is deleted.
  • Talk to your children about Internet safety and clearly define your rules.
  • Never respond to messages that make them feel confused or uncomfortable.
  • Pay attention to the games your children may download or copy.
  • Never arrange a face-to-face meeting with someone they meet online.

Reinforce a sense of safety. Some Internet content can evoke a sense of fear or lack of safety in your child. It can be difficult for some children to discern fact / fiction online. Try to offer reassurance that your child is safe. Children and youth take their emotional cues from the significant adults in their lives. Your reactions can help to model calmness to your child. Recognize that some children may be concerned about something bad happening to themselves, family or friends. Explain to them the safety measures in place and reassure them that you and other adults will take care of them.

Be a good listener and observer. Let children guide you to learn how concerned they are or how much information they need. If they are not focused on the issue, do not dwell on it. However, be available to answer their questions to the best of your ability. Young children may not be able to express themselves verbally. Pay attention to changes in their behaviour or social interactions.

Reach out. Reach out to the school if you feel that your child may be showing a significant reaction to online material. We may be able to offer some classroom strategies that could help reduce stress. It may also be important to seek additional support from a school mental health professional (i.e., social worker or psychologist) to cope with overwhelming feelings experienced by children and youth.

Sincerely,

The Henderson Ave. Team